Storm Area 51 Fizzles To Selfies and Alienstock

For all the hullabaloo, when the time came, only a few hundred people (of the 2+ million who RSVP) showed up for some music and camping.

Stormers were instructed to run like Naruto – and at least one man did – towards the base, because “they can’t stop all of us” was the mantra.

Andrew Griffin was there and “live blogged” the events for British newspaper The Independent:

If you’re just joining us, here’s a rough summary of the nights events, which happened at four main locations:

  • In Las Vegas, people gathered for Alienstock, which was run like a traditional EDM festival, with lots inflatable aliens.
  • In Hiko, there was another alien festival, with themed displays out in the desert.
  • And in Rachel, there was another Alienstock, with live rock music played out across the Nevada sand, and themed events. Despite the warnings from locals, this appears to have gone largely without major incident.

But perhaps most interestingly of all…

  • At the gate to Area 51 itself, some people did gather. They gathered round, chatted, took some photos and joked. While there are reports of at least one arrest, there was no attempt to storm Area 51.

Storm Area 51 Could Be Fyre Festival 2.0

The “Storm Area 51” organizer, Matty Roberts, is comparing Alienstock – music festival he organized as an alternative to Storm Area 51 – to the Fyre Festival – a name that has become synonymous with “epic failure.”

With just over a week to go until the event, Roberts and the host town’s website are both comparing Alienstock to the Fyre Festival, which was supposed to be held in April and May of 2017 in the Bahamas but became synonymous with “epic failure” and led to a fraud conviction. Roberts has pulled his name and support from the three-day gathering in Rachel, Nev., but the owner of a motel in the town who had signed up as a partner plans to go ahead.

Source: Washington Post

We shall see if a human disaster unfolds – or no one shows up and the joke event passes like a tumble weed in the Nevada desert.

Storm Area 51

Joke, Social Experiment or Human Disaster

It all started rather jokingly with a Facebook event entitled “Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us,” but then it grew into a massive – 2 million+ people say they’re “Going” – social experiment full of possibilities.

College student Matty Roberts, the creator of the event, came up with the idea after watching the Joe Rogan Experience podcast on June 20, 2019. At some point he started a Storm Area 51 website to capitalize on all this publicity. People even made a song/video or two or three about it.

This rural, rouged, dangerous area is no place for millions of shock visitors. They don’t have the resources to hold that many people; even Las Vegas – 65 miles away – doesn’t have enough capacity for that many people.

Lincoln County Sheriff Kerry Lee doesn’t expect many people to show up, but he knows what’s possible. “I think this started out as a joke but there may be enough people taking it seriously and it could be a problem,” the sheriff said. “Someone is going to get hurt and people may go to jail. It’s not anything to joke about.” Source: AP

Of course the US Air Force has warned people not to participate in this joke – and do not trespass on government property. The AF operates the Nevada Test and Training Range (Area 51 is part of), and they are ready and willing to “protect America and its assets.”

It all kicks off at 3 AM PDT, September 20, 2019. Grab some popcorn and pull up a chair.

Spencer Speaks at University of Florida

Full disclosure, I graduated from the University of Florida in 1995.

Judging by the tweets (#SpencerAtUF), a lot of people showed up to protest and now they’re walking out of the building.

Spencer, who heads the National Policy Institute, a nationalist think tank, is scheduled to speak at 2:30 p.m. EDT [October 19, 2017] at a [University of Florida] campus performing arts center. The university said it did not invite him to speak, but was obligated by law to allow the event.

Richard Spencer’s event at the university in Gainesville, which prompted the governor to declare a state of emergency to prepare for possible violence, comes about two months after rallies by neo-Nazis and white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, led to a deadly clash with counter-protesters.

The school said it will spend more than $500,000 on security, and the National Policy Institute is paying more than $10,000 to rent the facility and for security within the venue. Source: Reuters.com

Last December, Spencer visited Texas A&M University, and was met with a small crowd, most of whom were protesters. At that time I said watch this guy we’ll see him again.

 

Let’s put a pin in that

I’m posting this here just so we remember his name. I have a feeling we’re going to hear more from him in the future.

Richard Spencer, white nationalist and creator of the term alt-right spoke in Texas A&M’s Memorial Student Center on December 6. Source: TheBatt.com

While he was giving his speech the university was hosting an “Aggies United” event across the street. Some 400 people attended Spencer’s speech – most were protesters and most of the protesters weren’t students at A&M. Many more attended Aggies United.

Just weeks after the Texas A&M speech, Spencer is still in national headlines:

  • Spencer is considering race for Senate
  • His mom is target of hate
  • White supremacists targeting Jews in Montana (His mom lives in Whitefish, Montana)
  • Alt-right Plans Armed March Through Montana Town To Scare Jews

Zlad – Elektronik Supersonik

Santo Cilauro (born in Melbourne, Australia) is a film producer and comedian. One of the co-founders of The D-Generation, Santo wrote and performed in the show during the later half of the 1980s as well as a performer on the early 90s sketch comedy The Late Show. Not to mention co-authoring the Jetlag Travel Guides to Molvania, Phaic Tanand San Sombrero.

Zladko Vladcik (aka Zlad) is his fictitious version of a “Molvanîan” pop music artist. “Elektronik Supersonik” makes for a cheesy combination of Italo disco and Synthpop, with funny accents.

It’s 5-22-11, the world didn’t end [UPDATE]

Maybe it’s because “Macho Man” Randy Savage stopped Jesus from initiating the Rapture. Randy, a professional wrestler, died Friday, May 20, in a car accident in Florida. He had the means and the opportunity. Just saying. If they can predict the end of the world, then Randy could stop it (or delay it) – one theory is just as crazy as the other.

We haven’t heard from Harold Camping or Family Radio about why we are still here. Maybe they left us behind. Maybe they went first on purpose or accidentally. Until we hear from them we’ll never know. The Lord works in mysterious ways. Maybe He took Harold and his followers and left the rest of the Christians as a sort of Darwin Award for Harold.

UPDATE:

OAKLAND, Calif. – A California preacher who foretold of the world’s end only to see the appointed day pass with no extraordinarily cataclysmic event has revised his apocalyptic prophecy, saying he was off by five months and the Earth actually will be obliterated on Oct. 21. Source: news.yahoo.com

I’m starting to think this was a publicity stunt. So mark your calendars (again) on October 21, 2011, the world will be obliterated. Note to self…try to get back all the worldly possessions I gave away, at least for the next 5 months.

Sorry for the late news, but the world ends tomorrow

World Ends 5-21-11

Sorry I didn’t tell you sooner, but the world is going to end tomorrow (according to Harold Camping). Actually, he says the apocalypse starts May 21, 2011, and judgement day is 5 months later on October 21, 2011.

THE END OF THE WORLD IS ALMOST HERE!HOLY GOD WILL BRING JUDGMENT DAY ON MAY 21, 2011 via JUDGMENT DAY.

Be sure to drop by their website and leave a parting message or see if anyone’s around after May 21.

So if the apocalypse happens and no one is there to witness, does it actually happen? Tweet me tomorrow and let me know.

The magic number I’m still betting on is 12.21.12. It’s a number that’s been around longer. I trust old stuff.