The 2020 Primary Election

The schedule for Democratic and Republican primaries and caucuses is very confusing and convoluted. A good place to start is with Frontloading HQ.

The Democratic candidates are Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Elizabeth Warren, Tom Steyer, Amy Klobuchar, Tulsi Gabbard, Michael Bennet, John Delaney, Deval Patrick and Andrew Yang.

The Republican candidates are Donald Trump, Bill Weld, Rocky De La Fuente, Mark Sanford and Joe Walsh.

February 3

Iowa caucuses took place on February 3, 2020, but there wasn’t a clear Democratic winner because a new application (mobile app) failed to tally and report the votes correctly.

Monday night’s Iowa caucuses dragged on into the early hours of Tuesday with no clear Democratic winner declared, and the New York Times reported that a brand-new, untested mobile app designed in just two months was at least partially to blame for the holdup in results.

Source: Forbes

The Iowa Democratic Party (IDP) – the folks who commissioned the app – promised to have the majority of results published by 5 PM (ET) today.

On February 9, 2020, Iowa finally allotted Pete 14 delegates, Bernie 12, Elizabeth 8, Joe 6, and Amy 1, out of 41 for the Democratic caucus. For the Republican caucus, Donald got 39 and Bill got 1, out of 40.

Both Pete and Bernie requested a recount, which (completed Feb. 27) didn’t change the results, and it was finally certified by the IDP on February 29.

Withdrawals Before the Primaries

Democratic candidates who withdrew before the Primaries started: Beto O’Rourke, Bill de Blasio, Cory Booker, Eric Swalwell, Jay Inslee, Joe Sestak, John Delaney, John Hickenlooper, Julián Castro, Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand, Marianne Williamson, Mike Gravel, Richard Ojeda, Seth Moulton, Steve Bullock, Tim Ryan, Wayne Messam. Source: Wikipedia.

Republican candidates who withdrew before (or shortly after) the Primaries started: Joe Walsh, Mark Sanford. Source: Wikipedia.

February 11

New Hampshire primary results: Bernie 9, Pete 9, Amy 6, out of 24 total. For Republicans, Donald 22, out of 22 total.

Today, after the NH primary, Michael Bennet and Andrew Yang dropped out. On February 12, Deval Patrick suspended his campaign.

February 22

Nevada caucus results: Bernie 24, Joe 9, Pete 3, out of 36 available. For Republicans, they cancelled their caucus so Donald presumably gets all 25 delegates.

Side note: Michael Bloomberg (billionaire, former mayor of New York) qualified for the debate in Nevada (Feb. 19), but he was not on the ballot. He’s trying to buy his way in.

February 29

Happy Leap Day! South Carolina (D) primary results: Joe 39, Bernie 15 out of 54 delegates.

On March 1, Pete dropped out and gave his support to Joe.

On March 2, Amy dropped out and gave her support to Joe. Beto also gave his support to Joe.

March 3

“Super Tuesday” is primary/caucus day for Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia (D), and American Samoa (D).

If you’re keeping count, going into Super Tuesday, Bernie 60, Joe 54, Elizabeth 8, and Michael 0.

In Texas early voting starts February 18. If needed, the primary election runoff day will be May 26, 2020.

Texas has 228 Democratic delegates and 155 Republican delegates. 1283 The results for Texas are Joe 110, Bernie 99, Michael 11, Elizabeth 5, Cory 2 of 228 total. For Republicans, Donald 117 of 155 total.

Nationally, the totals so far are Joe 596, Bernie 531, Elizabeth 65, Michael 58, Pete 26, Amy 7, and Tulsi 1.

After spending $500+ million Michael Bloomberg dropped out on March 4. Bernie announced on March 4 that he will drop out if “Biden gets plurality” going into Democratic convention. On March 5, Elizabeth Warren withdrew from the race. This leaves Joe, Bernie, and Tulsi is still running.

Texas Candidates

U.S. Senate (Texas)
Democratic Party candidates
Chris Bell
Michael Cooper
Amanda Edwards
Jack Daniel Foster Jr.
Annie Garcia
Victor Harris
Mary Jennings Hegar
Sema Hernandez
D. R. Hunter
Adrian Ocegueda
Cristina Tzintzún Ramirez
Royce West

Republican Party candidates
John Cornyn (incumbent)
Virgil Bierschwale
John Castro
Dwayne Stovall
Mark Yancey

Independent candidates
Ricardo Turullols-Bonilla

U.S. House of Representatives (District 17 Texas)*
Democratic Party candidates
William Foster III
David Jaramillo
Rick Kennedy

Republican Party candidates
Ahmad Adnan
Scott Bland
Laurie Godfrey McReynolds
George Hindman
Todd Kent
Kristen Alamo Rowin
David Saucedo
Pete Sessions
Trent Sutton
Renee Swann
Elianor Vessali

Libertarian candidates
Ted Brown

*Bill Flores (R) is stepping down

Texas Governor
Greg Abbott (R) – Next election is 2022

Texas Lieutenant Governor
Dan Patrick (R) – Next election is 2022

Texas Attorney General
Ken Paxton (R) – Next election is 2022

Texas Senate (District 5)
Charles Schwertner (R) – Next election is 2022

Texas House of Representatives (District 14)
Democratic Party candidates
Janet Dudding
Raza Rahman

Republican Party candidates
John Raney (incumbent)

Comptroller of Public Accounts
Glenn Hegar (R) – Next election 2022

Commissioner of the General Land Office
George P. Bush (R) – Next election 2022

Commissioner of Agriculture
Sid Miller (R) – Next election 2022

Railroad Commissioner
Democratic Party candidates
Roberto Alonzo
Chrysta Castaneda
Kelly Stone
Mark Watson

Republican Party candidates
Ryan Sitton (incumbent)
James Wright

Libertarian Party candidates
Matt Sterett
Charlie Stevens

Read More

March 10

Democrats Abroad (D), Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota (D), and Washington primary results: Joe 177+, Bernie 111+ out of 352 delegates; Washington was still counting as of Wednesday at noon.

March 14

Northern Mariana Islands (D), and Guam (R)

March 15

Northern Mariana Islands (R)

March 17

Arizona (D), Florida, Illinois, and Ohio.

March 18

American Samoa (R)

One March 19, 2020, Tulsi dropped out and endorsed Joe Biden.

March 24

Georgia

March 29

Puerto Rico (D) and North Dakota (R)

April 4

Alaska, Hawaii (D), Louisiana, and Wyoming (D)

April 7

Wisconsin

April 28

Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island.

May 2

Guam (D), Kansas (D), Virginia (R), and South Carolina (R)

May 5

Indiana

May 9

Arizona (R), and Wyoming (R)

May 12

Nebraska, and West Virginia

May 19

Georgia (postponed due to coronavirus), Kentucky, and Oregon

May 30

United States Virgin Islands (R)

June 2

District of Columbia, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota

June 6

United States Virgin Islands (D)

June 7

Puerto Rico (R)

June 20

Louisiana (postponed due to coronavirus).

Brexit schmexit

Britain’s exit from the European Union is finally here. At the stroke of midnight, Brussels time, 5 PM Central US, on Friday, January 31, 2020, the deed is done.

Britain formally exits the European Union on Friday night, casting off from the Continent after nearly half a century and ending a debate that had convulsed the country for more than three years.

Source: New York Times: Britain’s Brexit Shrug: Let’s Just Get On With It

By the sounds of it – and going by how long it has dragged on – Britons are tired of it all and just want to get on with life. Not so fast. For all this time – time supposedly used to negotiate trade deals and legal separation agreements – it seems like very little was done: for the next 11 months they’ll work out trade relations.

Texans Will Soon Carry Guns During Disasters

Earlier this month, the Texas House passed H.B. 1177, a bill that would allow people who are evacuating after a disaster declaration to carry a gun without a license up to 7 days.

On Friday, May 24, the Senate passed their version which shortens the time period to 48 hours, but allows the governor to extend that time if needed.

The new law has to pass the House once more and go to the governor for signature. If signed, it would take effect September 1, 2019. The 86th Legislature runs from Jan. 8 to May 27 (today).

As a licensed-to-carry gun owner, I don’t know how I feel about letting unlicensed people walking around with guns during a stressful time. (Guns would be allowed in shelters too – if the shelter owner allows it.) I guess the legislature is trying to extend the castle doctrine during a disaster to stop looting and allow people to travel with protection (?).

Is Syria the Start of the Storm? #WW3

Last night, the United States, France and the United Kingdom, launched airstrikes against 3 strategic targets in Syria. The strikes were in reliation against alleged chemical weapons attacks that occurred on April 7, 2018. Russia, a Syrian ally, warned such actions will have consequences. Here is a brief timeline of events that have some wondering if we’re on the brink of World War III.

Continue reading

Bombs In Austin

Austin was rocked by 6 bomb blasts in 21 days. The suspect, 23-year-old Mark Anthony Conditt of Pflugerville, Texas, was killed in the last blast. His motive has yet to be determined. Here’s a timeline of what happened.

  • March 2: A package bomb kills 39-year-old Anthony Stephan House when it explodes on his front porch.
  • March 12: 17-year-old Draylen Mason, was killed and his mother was injured after a package exploded inside their home.
  • March 12: Hours after the second explosion occurred, police reported a third blast, confirming that at least one elderly woman was injured.
  • March 18: Two men in their 20s suffered non-life threatening injuries when they triggered a bomb via a tripwire while walking their bikes.
  • March 20: A bomb blast at a FedEx ground distribution facility in Schertz, Texas, injured one person.
  • March 21: Just before 5 am police/FBI/ATF corner Conditt at a Red Roof Inn on Interstate 35 in Round Rock, Texas. He drove off a short distance then blew himself up in his car. Source: FoxNews.com

The bad news is we may not be finished with this person or their bombs. FBI agent Chris Combs, head of the agency’s San Antonio office, said, “We are concerned that there may be other packages that are still out there.” Source: KBTX.com

The 2018 Primary Election in Texas

The Primary Election this year is March 6 (early voting starts February 20, in 2 weeks), and the General Election will be November 6 (early voting starts October 22). So far it’s a pretty quiet election – no hotly contested seats; Ted Cruz might have to campaign to keep his seat in the Senate.

UPDATE: More than 30 races are headed to runoffs on May 22. I think I’m eligible to vote for one: Lupe Valdez (D) and Andrew White (D) for governor. Source: Texas Tribune.

U.S. Senate (Texas)

  • Ted Cruz (R) – incumbent
  • Geraldine Sam (R)
  • Mary Miller (R)
  • Bruce Jacobson, Jr. (R)
  • Stefano de Stefano (R)
  • Beto O’Rourke (D)
  • Edward Kimbrough (D)
  • Sema Hernandez (D)

U.S. House of Representatives (District 17 Texas)

  • Bill Flores (R) – incumbent
  • Rick Kennedy (D)
  • Dale Mantey (D)

Texas Governor

  • Greg Abbott (R) – incumbent
  • Barbara Krueger (R)
  • Larry “Secede” Kilgore (R)
  • James Jolly Clark (D)
  • Cedric Davis (D)
  • Joe Mumbach (D)
  • Adrian Ocegueda (D)
  • Jeffrey Payne (D)
  • Lupe Valdez (D)
  • Tom Wakely (D)
  • Andrew White (D)
  • Grady Yarbrough (D)

Texas Lieutenant Governor

  • Dan Patrick (R) – incumbent
  • Scott Milder (R)
  • Mike Collier (D)
  • Michael Cooper (D)

Texas Attorney General

Texas Senate (District 5)

  • Charles Schwertner (R) – incumbent
  • Harold Ramm (R)
  • Glenn “Grumpy” Williams (D)
  • Brian E. Cronin (D)
  • Meg Walsh (D)

Texas House of Representatives (District 14)

  • John Raney (R) – incumbent
  • Jeston Texeira (R)
  • Sarah Laningham (R)
  • Rick Davis (R)
  • Josh Wilkinson (D)
  • Alex Vidal (D)

Comptroller of Public Accounts

  • Glenn Hegar (R) – incumbent
  • Tim Mahoney (D)
  • Joi Chevalier (D)

Commissioner of the General Land Office

  • George P. Bush (R) – incumbent
  • Davey Edwards (R)
  • Jerry Patterson (R)
  • Rick Range (R)
  • Tex Morgan (D)
  • Miguel Suazo (D)

Commissioner of Agriculture

  • Sid Miller (R) – incumbent
  • Trey Blocker (R)
  • Jim Hogan (R)
  • Kim Olson (D)

Railroad Commissioner

  • Christi Craddick (R) – incumbent
  • Weston Martinez (R)
  • Chris Spellmon (D)
  • Roman McAllen (D)

District Judge, (Texas) 85th Judicial District

  • Kyle Hawthorne (R) – incumbent

District Judge, (Texas) 272nd Judicial District

  • Travis B. Bryan III (R) – Next election 2020

District Judge, (Texas) 361st Judicial District

  • Steve Smith (R) – incumbent

District Attorney – Brazos County

  • Jarvis Parsons (R) – Next election 2020

Sheriff – Brazos County

  • Chris Kirk – Next election 2020

Read More

Five Presidents Visit Aggieland

Former Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush and Jimmy Carter will attend the event at Reed Arena at Texas A&M University. Source CNN.com

They’ll be in town Saturday to bolster donations and support for hurricane relief. Bush 41 wanted to do something bigger than a anniversary party for his library – it was his idea to have a concert and start a fund raising campaign – One America Appeal.

The weather isn’t cooperating. There is a 30% chance of rain during the day increasing to 90% chance at night.

Spencer Speaks at University of Florida

Full disclosure, I graduated from the University of Florida in 1995.

Judging by the tweets (#SpencerAtUF), a lot of people showed up to protest and now they’re walking out of the building.

Spencer, who heads the National Policy Institute, a nationalist think tank, is scheduled to speak at 2:30 p.m. EDT [October 19, 2017] at a [University of Florida] campus performing arts center. The university said it did not invite him to speak, but was obligated by law to allow the event.

Richard Spencer’s event at the university in Gainesville, which prompted the governor to declare a state of emergency to prepare for possible violence, comes about two months after rallies by neo-Nazis and white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, led to a deadly clash with counter-protesters.

The school said it will spend more than $500,000 on security, and the National Policy Institute is paying more than $10,000 to rent the facility and for security within the venue. Source: Reuters.com

Last December, Spencer visited Texas A&M University, and was met with a small crowd, most of whom were protesters. At that time I said watch this guy we’ll see him again.

 

Texas Voter ID Law: Federal Judge Says Law Intentionally Discriminates

Remember, this fight is far from over:

A federal judge ruled on Monday [April 10, 2017] that the voter identification law the Texas Legislature passed in 2011 was enacted with the intent to discriminate against black and Hispanic voters, raising the possibility that the state’s election procedures could be put back under federal oversight. Source: NYTimes.com

Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos, United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas, had made a similar ruling in 2014, but after Texas appealed her decision, a federal appellate court instructed her to review the issue once more.

Then came the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling which said Judge Ramos relied too much on Texas’ history of discriminatory voting and other “infirm” evidence.

Judge Ramos wrote the 5th District’s evidence “did not tip the scales” in favor of Texas.

Many southern states have fought the federal approval requirement for amending voting laws. Most of the issues were lifted when the Supreme Court decision in 2013 invalidated a key part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Source: NYTimes.com

And finally, something new:

With the ruling, two federal courts – in consecutive months – have found that Texas lawmakers knowingly discriminated against Latino and black voters in elections. In March, a three-judge panel in San Antonio ruled the Legislature illegally “packed” and “cracked” minority populations in certain districts while redrawing the state’s congressional map in 2011 – an effort to reduce their influence across Texas. Source: TexasTribune.com

Remember that phrase “packed and cracked” aka gerrymandering.