President Tests Positive for COVID-19

Just 32 days until the election, and 2 days after the first presidential debate of 2020, the President and the First Lady both test positive for COVID-19. The President tweeted the announcement late Thursday (10/1/2020) night.

Administration officials were surprise it hadn’t happened sooner.

CBS News White House correspondent Weijia Jiang reported that administration officials had expressed surprise for weeks that the virus hadn’t been detected among White House officials, given Mr. Trump’s own unenthusiastic embrace of measures recommended by senior health officials.

The president has often flouting his own administration’s guidelines on social distancing, mask-wearing and not gathering in large groups.

Source: CBS News

Stock markets around the world reacted negatively to the news; risk aversion set in.

Later in the morning, Biden and his wife, tested negative for the virus.

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his wife, Jill Biden, tested negative for coronavirus on Friday morning, the Bidens’ doctor said, following President Donald Trump’s disclosure that he had tested positive just days after the first debate.

Source: CNN

All the Makings of a Shitstorm

What’s going on and how did we get here? Violent protests have been raging across the country for a week after George Floyd, a black man, 46, was killed (murdered) by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on Monday, May 25, while Chauvin was trying to subdue Floyd with his knee on Floyd’s neck.

The independent autopsy [released June 1] says Floyd died of “asphyxiation from sustained pressure” when his neck and back were compressed by Minneapolis police officers during his arrest last week. The pressure cut off blood flow to his brain, that autopsy determined….The officer had his knee on Floyd’s neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds in total and two minutes and 53 seconds after Floyd was unresponsive, according to the criminal complaint against Chauvin, who faces charges in the death.

Source: CNN

Today, President Trump stirred the pot.

An active duty military police battalion consisting of 200 to 250 military personnel is now in the process of deploying to Washington, DC, and could be in the nation’s capital as soon as tonight, three US defense officials tell CNN.

Source: CNN

And he put the rest of the United States on notice. He threatened to invoke the Insurrection Act of 1807.

Declaring himself “your president of law and order,” President Donald Trump vowed Monday to return order to American streets using the military if widespread violence isn’t quelled

Source: CNN

But, the world is paying attention and they support the protests 100%.

Global Anger Grows Over George Floyd Death, and Becomes an Anti-Trump Cudgel
The criticism thundered from the streets of Berlin, London, Paris and Vancouver, to capitals in Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

Source: NY Times

Meanwhile, Governor Greg Abbott deployed the Texas National Guard to major cities in Texas, and today he declared a State of Disaster across all counties in Texas.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott declared a State of Disaster for all Texas counties after violent protests endangered public safety and threatened property loss and damage. This declaration gives the Governor the ability to designate federal agents to serve as Texas Peace Officers.

Source: News 4 San Antonio

I don’t see this ending well for anyone.

Oh yeah, Texas also had a record number of COVID19 cases for one day on Sunday: 1,949. And, there’s a tropical depression brewing off of the Yucatan peninsula.

Update 6/8/2020

Thousands pay tribute to George Floyd at public viewing in Houston

Update 6/10/2020

Even Texas A&M has felt the hatred of protesters. The Sul Ross statue was vandalized overnight with a rainbow-colored wig and graffiti – someone sprayed the words BLM, ACAB, and racist (and graphic depictions of the male sexual organ) on the statue with red paint.

Lawrence Sullivan “Sully” Ross was a Brigadier General during the Civil War and commander of the Texas Cavalry Brigade. After the war, he served as a Texas state senator, governor of Texas and, ultimately, president of the troubled Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, which eventually became Texas A&M University.

Source: KBTX.com

Organizers of the local Black Lives Matter group posted on Facebook that no one in their group did this.

Since the George Floyd protests started there has been a petition going around to remove the statue. Petitioners and protestors plan a peaceful protest on Saturday June 13, where they’ll walk from the administration building to the statue. Counter protesters (Aggies who want to keep the statue) say they’ll be a the statue on Saturday as well.

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

This new virus is called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, or Sars-CoV-2. The disease it causes is called Covid-19. Source: Wall Street Journal. This is a serious disease – “a potential pandemic.” They think it originated in a (animal) market in Wuhan, China, on December 1, 2019. As of March 3, 2020, the WHO reports that there are 92,315 confirmed cases – 3,131 deaths; 60 cases in the US and 6 deaths.

The WHO and the CDC are monitoring the disease very closely, and they are taking measures to minimize the spread of the disease – no thanks to President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence, his appointed “White House coronavirus response coordinator.” Source: Politico.com

Countries like China (Wuhan specifically) have been shut down; affecting the global economy. Hong Kong, Italy, Spain, South Korean, Japan, and Iran have also been hit hard. There’s talk of a global recession if this goes on for too much longer. (President Trump says it will be over by April, because of the warmer weather.)

A big health concern is the massing of people: any place or event where people gather is considered dangerous. The Summer Olympics, scheduled to open in Tokyo, Japan, on July 24, are in danger of being cancelled – or at best delayed for months. “March Madness” basketball tournaments might be played without fans. The Major League Baseball Opening Day is scheduled for March 26; they’re monitoring the situation.

Update 3/15/2020

Last week the WHO declared COVID-19 is a pandemic. Things are getting worse in the United States. Tomorrow, we’re starting to work-from-home and shelter-in-place for at least 1 week and possibly up to 8 weeks. It is already affecting the US economy, and we are looking at a global recession. Mnuchin dropped the “we could reach 20% unemployment” bomb, and the Fed cut rates to 0.0%. Smaller restaurants and retail shops in my town – and every city and town – are closing; health departments are mandating bars & restaurants close dining rooms. Some restaurants are adjusting – drive through, curbside, home delivery, etc.

Update 4/3/2020

Coronavirus map 4-2-2020
Coronavirus map April 3, 2020. Source: Johns Hopkins University.

As of now there have been 1,076,017 cases worldwide and 58,004 deaths (JHU map); 5,368 cases in Texas and 93 deaths (Texas DSHS). We’ve been ordered to continue to shelter-in-place until April 30.

Many States have postponed their Primaries until Summer. The 2020 Summer Olympics has been postponed until July 2021.

Update 4/15/2020

We are still stay-at-home/work-from-home, but there are signs that we will begin to “restart the economy” in phases in May.

Countries around the world are working to “flatten the curve” of the coronavirus pandemic. Flattening the curve involves reducing the number of new COVID-19 cases from one day to the next.

Source: Johns Hopkins University.

To date there have been 2,006,513 cases and 128,886 deaths worldwide (JHU map); 14,624 cases in Texas and 318 deaths (Texas DSHS).

Update 5/6/2020

Beginning in May, the President and the states’ governors were looking for ways to jump-start the economy – with coronavirus cases still increasing – and risking more American lives.

President Donald Trump fixed his course on reopening the nation for business, acknowledging that the move would cause more illness and death from the pandemic but insisting it’s a cost he’s willing to pay to get the economy back on track.

Source: Bloomberg.com

As of today there have been 3,688,635 cases worldwide and 258,051 deaths (JHU map); 1,205,138 cases in the United States and 71,078 deaths; 33,369 cases in Texas and 906 deaths (Texas DSHS).

On April 27, 2020, Governor Greg Abbott issued additional Executive Orders (GA-18) to continue the process of reopening the state of Texas: easing restrictions on onsite dining in restaurants (still no bars) , retail shops, movie theaters, malls, museums and libraries, and one-man shops.

Texas A&M President Michael Young basically told everyone to continue to work-from-home until until further notice (probably through May, maybe through June), but he – and Chancellor Sharp – want to have campus open for the Fall 2020 semester; all summer classes/activities will be online.

Update 5/19/2020

As of today there have been 4,829,232 cases worldwide and 319,031 deaths (JHU map); 1,508,957 cases in the United States and 90,369 deaths; 48,693 cases in Texas and 1,347 deaths (Texas DSHS).

On May 18, 2020, Governor Abbott issued an Executive Order (GA-23) to expand reopening the state of Texas: easing restrictions on onsite dining in restaurants (50% capacity), bars (25%), tattoo parlors, child-care, gyms (25%). At the end of May more restrictions will be lifted.

Update 6/4/2020

As of today there have been 6,542,851 cases worldwide and 386,581 deaths (JHU map); 1,852,561 cases in the United States and 107,191 deaths; 68,271 cases in Texas and 1,734 deaths (Texas DSHS).

Update 6/21/2020

As of today there have been 8,827,934 cases worldwide and 465,051 deaths (JHU map); 2,260,972 cases in the United States and 119,762 deaths; 107,735 cases in Texas and 2,165 deaths (Texas DSHS).

Update 7/5/2020

As of today there have been 11,304,534 cases worldwide and 531,659 deaths (JHU map); 2,841,124 cases in the United States and 129,689 deaths; 191,790 cases in Texas and 2,608 deaths (Texas DSHS).

Cases have been “spiking” in Arizona, Texas, and Florida, after these states began opening up in June. On Thursday (July 2) Governor Greg Abbott issued an Executive Order (GA-29) requiring all Texans to wear a face covering over the nose and mouth in public spaces in counties with 20 or more positive COVID-19 cases, with few exceptions.

Update 7/8/2020

Texas has once again broken its single-day record for new coronavirus cases. The state reported 10,028 new cases Tuesday [July 7] as officials warned that hospitals are reaching capacity. … The state also set a new record for single-day deaths, with 60.

Source: CBS News

Meanwhile, we are still working from home (week 17), summer classes are 100% online, and we’re in limbo looking at current case numbers and trying to plan for the future. The current plan is to have 50% online and 50% face-to-face classes in the fall with classes starting earlier on August 19, and ending November 24. Class days will be longer too, 8 am – 8:35 pm, and conference rooms will be used as classrooms.

Update 7/18/2020

As of today there have been 14,106,753 cases worldwide and 602,657 deaths (JHU map); 3,647,715 cases in the United States and 139,266 deaths; 307,572 cases in Texas and 3,735 deaths (Texas DSHS).

Update 8/1/2020

As of today there have been 17,614,426 cases worldwide and 679,987 deaths (JHU map); 4,563,445 cases in the United States and 153,320 deaths; 438,293 cases in Texas and 6,576 deaths (Texas DSHS).

Update 8/15/2020

As of today there have been 21,394,639 cases worldwide and 770,112 deaths (JHU map); 5,360,277 cases in the United States and 169,475 deaths; 528,838 cases in Texas and 10,268 deaths (Texas DSHS).

Students are back in College Station – “locust” buying everything in stores and queuing up in restaurants – without masks – before the start of the semester on Wednesday (8/19). This is not going to go well.

Update 9/9/2020

As of today there have been 27,617,194 cases worldwide and 898,456 deaths (JHU map); 6,330,316 cases in the United States and 189,733 deaths; 662,575 cases in Texas and 13,792 deaths (Texas DSHS).

Update 9/24/2020

As of today there have been 31,920,652 cases worldwide and 977,311 deaths (JHU map); 6,935,414 cases in the United States and 201,920 deaths; 742,913 cases in Texas and 15,372 deaths (Texas DSHS).

In Brazos County there was a spike after school started almost a month ago, but the number of active cases has come down to 672 as of yesterday. Despite the numbers, Texas A&M plans to host Vanderbilt this weekend for the first of 10 football games this season. The SEC scheduled conference-only games for each of its 9 universities.

Update 10/2/2020

Breaking News: Just 32 days until the election, and 2 days after the first presidential debate of 2020, the President and the First Lady both test positive for COVID-19. The President tweeted the announcement late Thursday (10/1/2020) night.

As of today there have been 34,448,691 cases worldwide and 1,025,315 deaths (JHU map); 7,318,110 cases in the United States and 208,485 deaths; 777,255 cases in Texas and 16,142 deaths (Texas DSHS).

Update 10/17/2020

As of today there have been 39,405,715 cases worldwide and 1,105,505 deaths (JHU map); 8,050,506 cases in the United States and 218,602 deaths; 843,487 cases in Texas and 17,375 deaths (Texas DSHS).

Update 10/31/2020

As of today there have been 45,930,223 cases worldwide and 1,193,339 deaths (JHU map); 9,111,013 cases in the United States and 230,320 deaths; 931,098 cases in Texas and 18,464 deaths (Texas DSHS).

Update 11/16/2020

As of today there have been 54,518,771 cases worldwide and 1,319,342 deaths (JHU map); 11,048,174 cases in the United States and 246,255 deaths; 1,059,753 cases in Texas and 20,002 deaths (Texas DSHS).

The 2020 Primary Election

The schedule for Democratic and Republican primaries and caucuses is very confusing and convoluted. A good place to start is with Frontloading HQ.


Coronavirus Updates

Starting March 15, 2020, the United States did something unprecedented (in modern times) – every non-essential worker was told/ordered to stay-at-home and/or work-from-home. This included primary workers. So, as a result, many states’ primaries were rescheduled.

The 2020 Democratic National Convention which was scheduled to take place in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on July 13-16, 2020, was delayed to August 17-20 due to concerns over the COVID-19 pandemic.

Democratic presidential primaries that were rescheduled/canceled:

PrimaryOriginalNewVote in person
OhioMarch 17April 28Cancelled
GeorgiaMarch 24June 9Scheduled
Puerto RicoMarch 29TBDTBA
AlaskaApril 4April 10Cancelled
WyomingApril 4April 17Cancelled
HawaiiApril 4May 22Cancelled
LouisianaApril 4July 11Scheduled
MarylandApril 28June 2Scheduled
ConnecticutApril 28August 11Scheduled
Rhode IslandApril 28June 2Scheduled
DelawareApril 28June 2Scheduled
PennsylvaniaApril 28June 2Scheduled
New YorkApril 28June 23
GuamMay 2TBDTBA
KansasMay 2May 2Cancelled
IndianaMay 5June 2Scheduled
West VirginiaMay 12June 9Scheduled
KentuckyMay 19June 23Scheduled
New JerseyJune 2July 7Scheduled

The 2020 Republican National Convention will be held from August 24 to 27, 2020, in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Republican presidential primaries were rescheduled:

  • The Ohio primary was rescheduled from March 17, 2020, to June 2, 2020. It was later rescheduled again from June 2 to April 28.
  • The Georgia primary was rescheduled from March 24, 2020, to May 19, 2020. It was later rescheduled again from May 19 to June 9.
  • The Louisiana primary was rescheduled from April 4, 2020, to June 20, 2020.
  • The Connecticut primary was rescheduled from April 28 to June 2.
  • The Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island primaries were rescheduled from April 28, 2020, to June 2, 2020.
  • The Indiana primary was rescheduled from May 5, 2020, to June 2, 2020.
  • The West Virginia primary was rescheduled from May 12, 2020, to June 9, 2020.
  • The Kentucky primary was rescheduled from May 19, 2020, to June 23, 2020.
  • The New Jersey primary was rescheduled from June 2, 2020 to July 7, 2020.
  • The Ohio primary was rescheduled from March 17, 2020, to June 2, 2020. was later rescheduled again from June 2 to April 28.
  • The Georgia primary was rescheduled from March 24, 2020, to May 19, 2020.[228] It was later rescheduled again from May 19 to June 9.
  • The Louisiana primary was rescheduled from April 4, 2020, to June 20, 2020.[237] It was later rescheduled again from June 20 to July 11.[209]
  • The Connecticut primary was rescheduled from April 28 to June 2.[205] It was later rescheduled a second time to August 11.[210]
  • The Delaware, Maryland,[238] Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island primaries were rescheduled from April 28, 2020, to June 2, 2020.
  • The Indiana primary was rescheduled from May 5, 2020, to June 2, 2020.
  • The West Virginia primary was rescheduled from May 12, 2020, to June 9, 2020.
  • The Kentucky primary was rescheduled from May 19, 2020, to June 23, 2020.[239]
  • The New Jersey primary was rescheduled from June 2, 2020 to July 7, 2020.[240]

The Democratic candidates are Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Elizabeth Warren, Tom Steyer, Amy Klobuchar, Tulsi Gabbard, Michael Bennet, John Delaney, Deval Patrick and Andrew Yang.

The Republican candidates are Donald Trump, Bill Weld, Rocky De La Fuente, Mark Sanford and Joe Walsh.

February 3

Iowa caucuses took place on February 3, 2020, but there wasn’t a clear Democratic winner because a new application (mobile app) failed to tally and report the votes correctly.

Monday night’s Iowa caucuses dragged on into the early hours of Tuesday with no clear Democratic winner declared, and the New York Times reported that a brand-new, untested mobile app designed in just two months was at least partially to blame for the holdup in results.

Source: Forbes

The Iowa Democratic Party (IDP) – the folks who commissioned the app – promised to have the majority of results published by 5 PM (ET) today.

On February 9, 2020, Iowa finally allotted Pete 14 delegates, Bernie 12, Elizabeth 8, Joe 6, and Amy 1, out of 41 for the Democratic caucus. For the Republican caucus, Donald got 39 and Bill got 1, out of 40.

Both Pete and Bernie requested a recount, which (completed Feb. 27) didn’t change the results, and it was finally certified by the IDP on February 29.

Withdrawals Before the Primaries

Democratic candidates who withdrew before the Primaries started: Beto O’Rourke, Bill de Blasio, Cory Booker, Eric Swalwell, Jay Inslee, Joe Sestak, John Delaney, John Hickenlooper, Julián Castro, Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand, Marianne Williamson, Mike Gravel, Richard Ojeda, Seth Moulton, Steve Bullock, Tim Ryan, Wayne Messam. Source: Wikipedia.

Republican candidates who withdrew before (or shortly after) the Primaries started: Joe Walsh, Mark Sanford. Source: Wikipedia.

February 11

New Hampshire primary results: Bernie 9, Pete 9, Amy 6, out of 24 total. For Republicans, Donald 22, out of 22 total.

Today, after the NH primary, Michael Bennet and Andrew Yang dropped out. On February 12, Deval Patrick suspended his campaign.

February 22

Nevada caucus results: Bernie 24, Joe 9, Pete 3, out of 36 available. For Republicans, they cancelled their caucus so Donald presumably gets all 25 delegates.

Side note: Michael Bloomberg (billionaire, former mayor of New York) qualified for the debate in Nevada (Feb. 19), but he was not on the ballot. He’s trying to buy his way in.

February 29

Happy Leap Day! South Carolina (D) primary results: Joe 39, Bernie 15 out of 54 delegates.

On March 1, Pete dropped out and gave his support to Joe.

On March 2, Amy dropped out and gave her support to Joe. Beto also gave his support to Joe.

March 3

“Super Tuesday” is primary/caucus day for Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia (D), and American Samoa (D).

If you’re keeping count, going into Super Tuesday, Bernie 60, Joe 54, Elizabeth 8, and Michael 0.

In Texas early voting starts February 18. If needed, the primary election runoff day will be May 26, 2020.

Texas has 228 Democratic delegates and 155 Republican delegates. 1283 The results for Texas are Joe 111, Bernie 102, Michael 10, Elizabeth 5 out of 228 Democratic delegates. For Republicans, Donald 117 of 155 total.

Nationally, the totals so far are Joe 596, Bernie 531, Elizabeth 65, Michael 58, Pete 26, Amy 7, and Tulsi 1.

After spending $500+ million Michael Bloomberg dropped out on March 4. Bernie announced on March 4 that he will drop out if “Biden gets plurality” going into Democratic convention. On March 5, Elizabeth Warren withdrew from the race. This leaves Joe, Bernie, and Tulsi is still running.

UPDATE: It looks like Texas is headed for primary runoff elections on July 14.

Here are the races in Texas as of July 1.
President Democratic candidate:
Joe Biden
President Republican candidate:
Donald Trump
US Senate Democratic candidates:
Mary Jennings Hegar
Royce West
US Senate Republican candidate:
John Cornyn (incumbent)
U.S. House of Representatives (District 17) Democratic candidates:
Rick Kennedy
David Jaramillo
U.S. House of Representatives (District 17) Republican candidates:
Pete Sessions
Renee Swann
Texas House of Representatives (District 14) Democratic candidate:
Janet Dudding
Texas House of Representatives (District 14) Republican candidate:
John Raney (incumbent)
Railroad Commissioner Democratic candidates:
Chrysta Castañeda
Roberto “Beto” Alonzo
Railroad Commissioner Democratic candidate:
James “Jim” Wright

Texas Candidates

U.S. Senate (Texas)
Democratic Party candidates
Chris Bell
Michael Cooper
Amanda Edwards
Jack Daniel Foster Jr.
Annie Garcia
Victor Harris
Mary Jennings Hegar
Sema Hernandez
D. R. Hunter
Adrian Ocegueda
Cristina Tzintzún Ramirez
Royce West

Republican Party candidates
John Cornyn (incumbent)
Virgil Bierschwale
John Castro
Dwayne Stovall
Mark Yancey

Independent candidates
Ricardo Turullols-Bonilla

U.S. House of Representatives (District 17 Texas)*
Democratic Party candidates
William Foster III
David Jaramillo
Rick Kennedy

Republican Party candidates
Ahmad Adnan
Scott Bland
Laurie Godfrey McReynolds
George Hindman
Todd Kent
Kristen Alamo Rowin
David Saucedo
Pete Sessions
Trent Sutton
Renee Swann
Elianor Vessali

Libertarian candidates
Ted Brown

*Bill Flores (R) is stepping down

Texas Governor
Greg Abbott (R) – Next election is 2022

Texas Lieutenant Governor
Dan Patrick (R) – Next election is 2022

Texas Attorney General
Ken Paxton (R) – Next election is 2022

Texas Senate (District 5)
Charles Schwertner (R) – Next election is 2022

Texas House of Representatives (District 14)
Democratic Party candidates
Janet Dudding
Raza Rahman

Republican Party candidates
John Raney (incumbent)

Comptroller of Public Accounts
Glenn Hegar (R) – Next election 2022

Commissioner of the General Land Office
George P. Bush (R) – Next election 2022

Commissioner of Agriculture
Sid Miller (R) – Next election 2022

Railroad Commissioner
Democratic Party candidates
Chrysta Castañeda
Roberto “Beto” Alonzo
Kelly Stone
Mark Watson

Republican Party candidates
Ryan Sitton (incumbent)
James Wright

Libertarian Party candidates
Matt Sterett
Charlie Stevens

Read More

March 10

Democrats Abroad (D), Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota (D), and Washington primary results: Joe 177+, Bernie 111+ out of 352 delegates; Washington was still counting as of Wednesday at noon.

March 14

Northern Mariana Islands (D), and Guam (R)

March 15

Northern Mariana Islands (R)

March 17

Arizona (D), Florida, Illinois, and Ohio.

March 18

American Samoa (R)

One March 19, 2020, Tulsi dropped out and endorsed Joe Biden.

March 24

Georgia (postponed to May 19)

March 29

Puerto Rico (D) and North Dakota (R) primary results: ND Republicans cancelled election, Trump got 29 out of 29 delegates; PR is TBD.

April 4

Alaska, Hawaii (D), Louisiana, and Wyoming (D)

April 7

Democrats warn people will die as courts rule Wisconsin’s election on for Tuesday Source: NBC News

Wisconsin results: Joe 58, Bernie 13, out of 84 Democratic delegates. Donald 52 out of 52 Republican delegates.

On April 8, Bernie Sanders suspended his campaign.

April 28

Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island.

May 2

Guam (D), Kansas (D), Virginia (R), and South Carolina (R)

May 5

Indiana

May 9

Arizona (R), and Wyoming (R)

May 12

Nebraska, and West Virginia

May 19

Georgia, Kentucky, and Oregon

May 30

United States Virgin Islands (R)

June 2

District of Columbia, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota

June 6

United States Virgin Islands (D)

June 7

Puerto Rico (R)

President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un meet for historic summit…

They met in Singapore on June 12, 2018, to discuss nuclear disarmament of North Korea.

Just two weeks ago Pres. Trump sent a letter canceling the summit. These sure are strange times we are living in – he has to be (one of) the oddest president.

Is Syria the Start of the Storm? #WW3

Last night, the United States, France and the United Kingdom, launched airstrikes against 3 strategic targets in Syria. The strikes were in reliation against alleged chemical weapons attacks that occurred on April 7, 2018. Russia, a Syrian ally, warned such actions will have consequences. Here is a brief timeline of events that have some wondering if we’re on the brink of World War III.

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